Thursday, 28 June 2012

Why do we use flash

Flash's sizable advantage is the widespread distribution of the program necessary to play Flash content on a variety of devices throughout the net world. Adobe claims on their Web-site that 98 percent of Internet-enabled desktops worldwide have the Flash player installed, & so do hundreds of millions of other devices.

Having the support of the dominant online video providers is obviously a sizable and for market penetration, but Flash has a variety of technical benefits as well.

Flash also supports H.264 compression, which is used around the globe for video recording & delivery. Ideally, this would permit video that was already compressed using H.264 to be directly imported & streamed without much manipulation, or for video to be exported basically to other players.

Flash is strong in Web pages that merge both vector animation & bit-mapped raster graphics. Vector graphics require much less knowledge compared to sending frame after frame of knowledge describing the changes to hundreds of pixels, even using advanced compression technologies.

Regrettably, Flash's advanced stream management techniques, coupled with the variable bit-rate control methods used, make this impractical. In lieu, videos normally require transcoding before they can be streamed using Flash, & similar manipulations are needed to export Flash files for playback in other formats. This is a double-edged sword Flash can deliver high-quality images to users on lots of different platforms, but it's the disadvantage of requiring distinctive file structures.

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